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the gloves are off in the soda wars

October 10, 2012

in communication,culture,obesity,wellness

while news has focused on the deal chicago’s rahm emanuel struck with the american beverage association to fund a $5 million employee health challenge with san antonio, the lid on the soda wars is about to be blown off, thanks to a new video from the center for science in the public interest.

this new video skewers the standard soda commercial—particularly coke’s, with its mathematical equation of sun + coke + bears = happiness. the video gets increasingly bold in its message. by the end, the family of bears has faced the injustices and infirmities associated with obesity, including ripped bear “suits,” erectile dysfunction and sawed-off limbs.

an article about the video in usa today includes this quote from coke:

“This is irresponsible and grandstanding and will not help anyone understand energy balance,” says Coca-Cola spokeswoman Susan Stribling. “It also distorts the facts while we and our industry partners are working with government and civil society on real solutions.”

what do you think, now that you’ve watched it? personally, i find it gutsy, funny and pointed. soda fills us with unnecessary calories. many people still don’t understand how much sugar they consume with soda and what that soda does to their bodies. this video leaves them with no doubt. the fact that it delivers its message without pointing fingers at the people who drink soda is a big win.

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10.11.2012  i found this video of a coke dance vending machine on brandflakesforbreakfast. using technology similar to the kinect or wii, the machine gives out cokes to those who dance with it. nice one by coke.

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Jared October 11, 2012 at 2:39 pm

Certainly a powerful portait of what an addiction to sugary beverages can do. The CSPI clearly holds no punches here. If food marketers can get away with “subtle misrepresentations’ in their ads, public interest groups should be able to employ brutal honesty to convey their messages, no matter how unpleasant that may be.

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